Stuart Brown: Why play is vital — no matter your age

www.ted.com A pioneer in research on play, Stuart Brown says humor, games, roughhousing, flirtation and fantasy are more than just fun. Plenty of play in childhood makes for happy, smart adults — and keeping it up can make us smarter at any age.TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes and “Lost” producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Watch the Top 10 TEDTalks on TED.com, at http

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25 thoughts on “Stuart Brown: Why play is vital — no matter your age

  1. johnlobu

    sex is the play which is most interesting and it starts increasingly from childhood.
    but it has disastrous effects in form of child abuse, rapes, traumas.

    Play whose objective is not peace can’t be play.

  2. johnlobu

    sex is the play which is most interesting and it starts increasingly from childhood.
    but it has disastrous effects in form of child abuse, rapes, traumas.

    Play whose objective is not peace can’t be play.

  3. rowanrockhopper2

    @Subbbba thankyou – its quite surreal having a question you asked a year ago being answered… finally 🙂

  4. okonomiyaki4U

    100% true! The problem is, that a lot of people who are in charge of our life (e.g. the guy at the other side of the table during a job interview) are not responding to play-signals like the Polarbear. They just kill you faster. Pitty…..

  5. jacksawild

    My old grandmother used to give the opposite advice. As in, “stop playing with yourself”. I knew she was wrong.

  6. dinogrower

    The part at the end with the body suits and drawing on each other? Imagine how offensive for a high power distance culture that demands interpersonal distance.

  7. mrskittykate

    Can’t disagree about the importance of play, but I can’t think of a more boring speaker on the topic!!!

  8. stealthmeth

    shittt i dont know about you, but ” i dont wanna be playaa nooo moreeee “actually ‘im not a player i just crush alot”

  9. JBELLE127

    Sounds like some of us didn’t get enough “play time” when we were young! Actually isn’t this also about Creative and Alternate Thought?

  10. AubreyDebrett

    That is precisely what I’m talking about. Nonsense. Gibberish. Poppycock. Prattle. Hooey. Babble. Hogwash. Tripe. Hot Air. Mumbo Jumbo. Bunk. Claptrap. Balderdash.

  11. AubreyDebrett

    You say ‘Soul’ and ‘energy’, I say Stuff and Nonsense. Does anyone who uses these words stop to ask themselves: What do I actually mean? And how many of these people who ask themselves this question, or have it asked of them, can actually answer it? And how many of those answers actually make sense? Very few and very few and very few!

  12. RJHEllis

    So in summary, it IS GOOD to be a player. Thank you for the evidence thats its GREAT to be a “player” lol

  13. soccerdogg007

    In relation to your comment….A great teacher is more like a conductor that reacts to the conditions and the potential presented to them.

  14. jimlovesearth2

    what about playing rough… like getting an adrenaline rush from doing something life threatening.. there are adrenaline junkies that really play for blood. That can’t be so healthy. Or that David Carradine autoerotic asphyxication- is that healthy play… doesn’t seem like it.

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